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Red Famine

By Anne Applebaum
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Signal
  • Isbn : 0771009313
  • Pages : 384
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 924
  • File Pdf: red-famine.pdf

Book Summary:

Winner of the 2018 Lionel Gelber Prize From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gulag and Iron Curtain, winner of the Cundill Prize and a finalist for the National Book Award, a revelatory history of Stalin's greatest crime. In 1929, Stalin launched his policy of agricultural collectivization -- in effect a second Russian revolution -- which forced millions of peasants off their land and onto collective farms. The result was a catastrophic famine, the most lethal in European history. At least five million people perished between 1931 and 1933 in the U.S.S.R. In Red Famine, Anne Applebaum reveals for the first time that three million of them died not because they were accidental victims of a bad policy, but because the state deliberately set out to kill them. Applebaum proves what has long been suspected: that Stalin set out to exterminate a vast swath of the Ukrainian population and replace them with more cooperative, Russian-speaking peasants. A peaceful Ukraine would provide the Soviets with a safe buffer between itself and Europe, and would be a bread basket region to feed Soviet cities and factory workers. When the province rebelled against collectivization, Stalin sealed the borders and began systematic food seizures. Starving, people ate anything: grass, tree bark, dogs, corpses. In some cases they killed one another for food. Devastating and definitive, Red Famine captures the horror of ordinary people struggling to survive extraordinary evil.

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  • File Pdf: borderland.pdf

Book Summary:

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  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
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Book Summary:

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  • File Pdf: the-harvest-of-sorrow.pdf

Book Summary:

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  • File Pdf: twilight-of-democracy.pdf

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  • File Pdf: the-years-of-hunger.pdf

Book Summary:

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  • File Pdf: stalin-s-genocides.pdf

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  • File Pdf: harvest-of-despair.pdf

Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

PULITZER PRIZE WINNER • This magisterial and acclaimed history offers the first fully documented portrait of the Gulag, from its origins in the Russian Revolution, through its expansion under Stalin, to its collapse in the era of glasnost. “A tragic testimony to how evil ideologically inspired dictatorships can be.” –The New York Times The Gulag—a vast array of Soviet concentration camps that held millions of political and criminal prisoners—was a system of repression and punishment that terrorized the entire society, embodying the worst tendencies of Soviet communism. Applebaum intimately re-creates what life was like in the camps and links them to the larger history of the Soviet Union. Immediately recognized as a landmark and long-overdue work of scholarship, Gulag is an essential book for anyone who wishes to understand the history of the twentieth century.

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  • File Pdf: the-ukrainian-night.pdf

Book Summary:

A vivid and intimate account of the Ukrainian Revolution, the rare moment when the political became the existential What is worth dying for? While the world watched the uprising on the Maidan as an episode in geopolitics, those in Ukraine during the extraordinary winter of 2013–14 lived the revolution as an existential transformation: the blurring of night and day, the loss of a sense of time, the sudden disappearance of fear, the imperative to make choices. In this lyrical and intimate book, Marci Shore evokes the human face of the Ukrainian Revolution. Grounded in the true stories of activists and soldiers, parents and children, Shore’s book blends a narrative of suspenseful choices with a historian’s reflections on what revolution is and what it means. She gently sets her portraits of individual revolutionaries against the past as they understand it—and the future as they hope to make it. In so doing, she provides a lesson about human solidarity in a world, our world, where the boundary between reality and fiction is ever more effaced.

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  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
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  • Pages : 248
  • Category : Business & Economics
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  • File Pdf: eating-people-is-wrong-and-other-essays-on-famine-its-past-and-its-future.pdf

Book Summary:

New perspectives on the history of famine—and the possibility of a famine-free world Famines are becoming smaller and rarer, but optimism about the possibility of a famine-free future must be tempered by the threat of global warming. That is just one of the arguments that Cormac Ó Gráda, one of the world's leading authorities on the history and economics of famine, develops in this wide-ranging book, which provides crucial new perspectives on key questions raised by famines around the globe between the seventeenth and twenty-first centuries. The book begins with a taboo topic. Ó Gráda argues that cannibalism, while by no means a universal feature of famines and never responsible for more than a tiny proportion of famine deaths, has probably been more common during very severe famines than previously thought. The book goes on to offer new interpretations of two of the twentieth century’s most notorious and controversial famines, the Great Bengal Famine and the Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine. Ó Gráda questions the standard view of the Bengal Famine as a perfect example of market failure, arguing instead that the primary cause was the unwillingness of colonial rulers to divert food from their war effort. The book also addresses the role played by traders and speculators during famines more generally, invoking evidence from famines in France, Ireland, Finland, Malawi, Niger, and Somalia since the 1600s, and overturning Adam Smith’s claim that government attempts to solve food shortages always cause famines. Thought-provoking and important, this is essential reading for historians, economists, demographers, and anyone else who is interested in the history and possible future of famine.

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  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Weidenfeld & Nicolson
  • Isbn : 1474600468
  • Pages : 576
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
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  • File Pdf: lenin-the-dictator.pdf

Book Summary:

'A fresh, powerful portrait of Lenin' Anne Applebaum, author of Red Famine 'Richly readable ... An enthralling but appalling story' Francis Wheen, author of Karl Marx The cold, one-dimensional figure of Lenin the political fanatic is only a partial truth. Drawing on extensive material that has only recently become available, Sebestyen's gripping biography casts an intriguing new light on the character behind the politics. In reality, Lenin was a man who loved nature as much as he loved making revolution, and his closest relationships were with women. He built a state based on terror. But he was a highly emotional man given to furious rages and deep passions. While never ignoring the politics, Sebestyen examines Lenin's inner life, his relationship with his wife and his long love affair with Inessa Armand, the most romantic and beguiling of Bolsheviks. These two women were as significant as the men - Stalin or Trotsky - who created the world's first Communist state with him.

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  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Isbn : 1250151279
  • Pages :
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  • File Pdf: lightning-down.pdf

Book Summary:

An American fighter pilot doomed to die in Buchenwald but determined to survive. On August 13, 1944, Joe Moser set off on his forty-fourth combat mission over occupied France. Soon, he would join almost 170 other Allied airmen as prisoners in Buchenwald, one of the most notorious and deadly of Nazi concentration camps. Tom Clavin's Lightning Down tells this largely untold and riveting true story. Moser was just twenty-two years old, a farm boy from Washington State who fell in love with flying. During the War he realized his dream of piloting a P-38 Lightning, one of the most effective weapons the Army Air Corps had against the powerful German Luftwaffe. But on that hot August morning he had to bail out of his damaged, burning plane. Captured immediately, Moser’s journey into hell began. Moser and his courageous comrades from England, Canada, New Zealand, and elsewhere endured the most horrific conditions during their imprisonment... until the day the orders were issued by Hitler himself to execute them. Only a most desperate plan would save them. The page-turning momentum of Lightning Down is like that of a thriller, but the stories of imprisoned and brutalized airmen are true and told in unforgettable detail, led by the distinctly American voice of Joe Moser, who prays every day to be reunited with his family. Lightning Down is a can’t-put-it-down inspiring saga of brave men confronting great evil and great odds against survival.

All Blood Runs Red

By Phil Keith,Tom Clavin
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Harlequin
  • Isbn : 1488036039
  • Pages : 352
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 150
  • File Pdf: all-blood-runs-red.pdf

Book Summary:

The incredible story of the first African American military pilot, who went on to become a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance and an American civil rights pioneer Eugene Bullard lived one of the most fascinating lives of the twentieth century. The son of a former slave and an indigenous Creek woman, Bullard fled home at the age of eleven to escape the racial hostility of his Georgia community. When his journey led him to Europe, he garnered worldwide fame as a boxer, and later as the first African American fighter pilot in history. After the war, Bullard returned to Paris a celebrated hero. But little did he know that the dramatic, globe-spanning arc of his life had just begun. All Blood Runs Red is the inspiring untold story of an American hero, a thought-provoking chronicle of the twentieth century and a portrait of a man who came from nothing and by his own courage, determination, gumption, intelligence and luck forged a legendary life.

A History of Ethiopia

By Harold G. Marcus
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Isbn : 9780520925427
  • Pages : 336
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 301
  • File Pdf: a-history-of-ethiopia.pdf

Book Summary:

In this eminently readable, concise history of Ethiopia, Harold Marcus surveys the evolution of the oldest African nation from prehistory to the present. For the updated edition, Marcus has written a new preface, two new chapters, and an epilogue, detailing the development and implications of Ethiopia as a Federal state and the war with Eritrea.

The Lion House

By Christopher de Bellaigue
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Isbn : 0374720452
  • Pages : 288
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 887
  • File Pdf: the-lion-house.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book The Lion House

Summary of Anne Applebaum's Red Famine

By Milkyway Media
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Milkyway Media
  • Isbn : N.a
  • Pages :
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 359
  • File Pdf: summary-of-anne-applebaum-s-red-famine.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book Summary of Anne Applebaum's Red Famine

Denial: the Final Stage of Genocide?

By John Cox,Amal Khoury,Sarah Minslow
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1000437361
  • Pages : 232
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 148
  • File Pdf: denial.pdf

Book Summary:

Genocide denial not only abuses history and insults the victims but paves the way for future atrocities. Yet few, if any, books have offered a comparative overview and analysis of this problem. Denial: The Final Stage of Genocide? is a resource for understanding and countering denial. Denial spans a broad geographic and thematic range in its explorations of varied forms of denial—which is embedded in each stage of genocide. Ranging far beyond the most well-known cases of denial, this book offers original, pathbreaking arguments and contributions regarding: competition over commemoration and public memory in Ukraine and elsewhere transitional justice in post-conflict societies global violence against transgender people, which genocide scholars have not adequately confronted music as a means to recapture history and combat denial public education’s role in erasing Indigenous history and promoting settler-colonial ideology in the U.S. "triumphalism" as a new variant of denial following the Bosnian Genocide denial vis-à-vis Rwanda and neighboring Congo (DRC) With contributions from leading genocide experts as well as emerging scholars, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of history, genocide studies, anthropology, political science, international law, gender studies, and human rights.

Famine

By T.A. Chase
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Totally Entwined Group (USA+CAD)
  • Isbn : 1784308811
  • Pages : 140
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 417
  • File Pdf: famine.pdf

Book Summary:

Saving a dying man might be just what Famine, the Black Horseman, needs to feed his starving heart. Having been sacrificed by his village shaman, Famine knows what it's like to do anything to survive. He wanders the world, sowing drought and starvation in his wake. Yet he hates being the Black Horseman more than anything in the world, except the man who ended his life all those centuries ago. Famine never stops doing his job, and never allows himself to fall in love. Ekundayo wants a better life for himself, so he steals a diamond from the mine where he works. Nothing goes well for him after that, and he finds himself dying in the desert on his way to the border. When he's rescued by Famine, Ekundayo isn't sure if his luck has changed or not. The longer he stays in Famine's company, the more Ekundayo discovers he just might be falling in love with Famine. One bad choice on Ekundayo's part and a future together seems out of reach. Will Famine let his only possibility of love go or will he defy Death himself to keep Ekundayo?

One Hundred Years in Galicia

By Dennis Ougrin,Anastasia Ougrin
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • Isbn : 1527560570
  • Pages : 140
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 270
  • File Pdf: one-hundred-years-in-galicia.pdf

Book Summary:

Ukrainian Galicia was home to Poles, Jews and Ukrainians for hundreds of years. It was witness to both World Wars, starvation, mass killings and independence movements. Family members of the authors include survivors of German concentration camps and the GULAG prisons. They fought in Austrian, Polish, Russian and German armies, as well as in the Ukrainian pro-independence army. They were arrested by the Gestapo and the NKVD, tortured and even declared dead. They survived against the most unlikely odds. Their stories, shadows and secrets permeate this book and provide a rich background to some of the most dramatic events humanity has witnessed.

The Holocaust/Genocide Template in Eastern Europe

By Ljiljana Radonić
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1000712125
  • Pages : 160
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 822
  • File Pdf: the-holocaust-genocide-template-in-eastern-europe.pdf

Book Summary:

The Holocaust/Genocide Template in Eastern Europe discusses the “memory wars” in the course of the post-Communist re-narration of history since 1989 and the current authoritarian backlash. The book focuses specifically on how “mnemonic warriors” employ the “Holocaust template” and the concept of genocide in tendentious ways to justify radical policies and externalize the culpability for their international isolation and worsening social and economic circumstances domestically. The chapters analyze three dimensions: 1) the competing narratives of the “universalization of the Holocaust” as the negative icon of our era, on the one hand, and the “double genocide” paradigm, on the other, which focuses on “our own” national suffering under – allegedly “equally” evil – Nazism and Communism; 2) the juxtaposition of post-Communist Eastern Europe and Russia, reflected primarily in the struggle of the Baltic states and Ukraine to challenge Russian propaganda, a struggle that runs the risk of employing similarly distorting and propagandistic tropes; and 3) the post-Yugoslav rhetoric portraying one’s own group as “the new Jews” and one’s opponents in the wars of the 1990s as (akin to) “Nazis”. Surveying major battle sites in this “memory war”: memorial museums, monuments, film and the war over definitions and terminology in relevant public discourse, The Holocaust/Genocide Template in Eastern Europe will be of great interest to scholars of genocide, the Holocaust, historical memory and revisionism, and Eastern European Politics. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research.

Franco's Famine

By Miguel Ángel del Arco Blanco,Peter Anderson
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Isbn : 1350174653
  • Pages : 280
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 414
  • File Pdf: franco-s-famine.pdf

Book Summary:

At least 200,000 people died from hunger or malnutrition-related diseases in Spain during the 1940s. This book provides a political explanation for the famine and brings together a broad range of academics based in Spain, the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia to achieve this. Topics include the political causes of the famine, the physical and social consequences, the ways Spaniards tried to survive, the regime's reluctance to accept international relief, the politics of cooking at a time of famine, and the memory of the famine. The volume challenges the silence and misrepresentation that still surround the famine. It reveals the reality of how people perished in Spain because the Francoist authorities instituted a policy of food self-sufficiency (or autarky): a system of price regulation which placed restrictions on transport as well as food sales. The contributors trace the massive decline in food production which followed, the hoarding which took place on an enormous scale and the vast and deeply iniquitous black market that subsequently flourished at a time when salaries plunged to 50% below their levels in 1936: all contributing factors in the large-scale atrocity explored fully here for the first time.